Monday, February 9, 2009

Is it Mid-February Already?

Sorry, didn't mean to fall silent here.  It's just that I've read dozens of articles of well-intentioned (or not) people talking about their work in their blogs and getting busted.  I've seen some really interesting work cross my desk but all I can talk about is that I can't talk about it.  But I can say I love this freakin' job.  It's one of those jobs that you conjure in your head, when you lean back in your chair in your cubicle in your unpleasant real-life job, when you're trying to envision what a much, much better job would look like.  I thought a job like this would only exist in Manhattan or Los Angeles--I had no idea Minneapolis was hiding such a gem.

Do I love editing?  Yes, I do love editing.  I re-enact the Jabba's pleasure-barge scene from Return of the Jedi when Luke's compelled to walk off the skiff into the Sarlacc's pit, except it's me.  Things look dark and the crude hirelings are chortling to themselves as I step closer and closer to the edge.  Then I jump, grab the plank, flip myself around, and R2-D2 fires a single red pen up into the air.  I compel it to my palm, uncap it, and then the real slaughter begins.

I had a great time in class tonight.  We discussed point of view and I read my project, The Trial of St. Euphrasia.  I had researched it way too much and couldn't use most of my research in the piece, so I've stored it as a file and hopefully it will be useful for something else later.  I do not want to write creative historical non fiction.  It was just really interesting to read about Theodocius the Younger, "the Calligrapher," and his history.  Theodocius was Euphrasia's father's boss, that's why it was relevant, but I couldn't really include it in a piece that was supposed to be about an unwilling patron saint compelled to watch over a naughty young girl.  I've also been reading Xenophon's account of Cyrus' bid for power, and I wish to iterate that I am not a history buff, but this is just also a really interesting story.  I really like the ancient writers Xenophon and Seneca: the former because he tersely summarizes points of military strategy and diplomacy but goes into detail about what it's like to discover new animals and new food in new countries; the latter because he has a grand sense of humor as pertains to social commentary.  He loves to use the "why, you may ask?" technique to give himself permission to answer questions nobody asked, a playful approach one might not assume with a classical philosopher a dozen centuries dead.

The moon is full tonight so the cats are charging throughout the apartment like a tiny black-and-grey stampede.  Rebecca was playing drums on Rock Band when I got home, but she put them away and listened to my short stories from class.  I'm glad she makes the effort to share my work, even if some of my writing isn't within her favorite genre.  She's very supportive of my writing and I'm grateful for it.  I'm also plowing through some Neil Gaiman and Gene Wolfe compilations, and the fact that they have so many compilations full of so many short stories in each kind of shames me, as I have not written nearly as much, but it also inspires me to write my pasty ass off, just start cranking out these ideas I have and submitting them wherever relevant.  More's the pity that the Writer's Market Web site seems to be suffering a prolonged illness...

2 comments:

Bexley said...

I identify. I too am constrained by the cursed NDA. I was up at Village Games a week ago, talking to the Carl, the owner (who was an FFG corworker, laid off at the same time I was) when a customer had come up and asked a question about a game. Carl and I looked at each other, trying to think of how to answer without giving the real answer, which could have gotten us both in trouble had the news gotten out.

BATTLEFINCH said...

tangent - my new nephew is named Cyrus...